Demand for Food Safety Attributes for Vegetables in Malaysia

Abdul Hadi, Ahmad Hanis Izani and Radam, Alias and Shamsudin, Mad Nasir and Selamat, Jinap (2010) Demand for Food Safety Attributes for Vegetables in Malaysia. Environment Asia, 3 (3). pp. 160-167. ISSN 1906-1714

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Official URL: http://www.tshe.org/ea/abstracts/2010_3-s_24.html

Abstract

In a developing economy like Malaysia with rising per capita income, there have been changes in the consumer demand for food attributes such as safety, freshness, appearance and texture. This study investigated the demand for food safety attributes for vegetables. The results suggested that food safety attributes were ranked the highest for leafy and root vegetables, and ranked second behind freshness for fruit vegetables. Consumers were also willing to pay premium prices for the safety attributes. The findings would have positive implications for the agrifood industry if it responds effectively to translate into business opportunities to these changes.

Item Type:Article
Keyword:food attributes, food safety, willingness to pay, vegetables
Faculty or Institute:Faculty of Agriculture
Publisher:Thai Society of Higher Eduction Institutes on Environment
ID Code:11319
Deposited By: Norhazura Hamzah
Deposited On:30 Mar 2011 00:34
Last Modified:30 Mar 2011 00:46

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