Edible films and coatings: characteristics and properties.

Bourtoom, T. (2008) Edible films and coatings: characteristics and properties. International Food Research Journal, 15 (3). ISSN 1985-4668

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Abstract

Edible films and coatings have received considerable attention in recent years because of their advantages including use as edible packaging materials over synthetic films. This could contribute to the reduction of environmental pollution. By functioning as barriers, such edible films and coatings can feasibly reduce the complexity and thus improve the recyclability of packaging materials, compared to the more traditional non-environmental friendly packaging materials, and may be able to substitute such synthetic polymer films. New materials have been developed and characterized by scientists, many from abundant natural sources that have traditionally been regarded as waste materials. The objective of this review is to provide a comprehensive introduction to edible coatings and films by providing descriptions of suitable materials, reviewing their properties and describing methods of their applications and potential uses.

Item Type:Article
Faculty or Institute:Faculty of Food Science and Technology
ID Code:732
Deposited By: Yusfauhannum Mohd Yunus
Deposited On:25 Nov 2008 15:56
Last Modified:27 May 2013 06:50

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