Net Primary Productivity of Forest Trees: A Review of Current Issue

Abdul Hamid, Hazandy and Mencuccini, Maurizio and Ab Shukor, Nor Aini (2009) Net Primary Productivity of Forest Trees: A Review of Current Issue. Pertanika Journal of Tropical Agricultural Science, 32 (2). pp. 111-123. ISSN 1511-3701

[img] PDF - Published Version
394Kb

Abstract

Forest growth is important both economically and ecologically and it follows a predictable general trend with age. Generally, the growth of all forests accelerates as canopies develop in young forests and declines substantially soon after the maximum leaf area is attained. The causes of this decline trend are multiple. Initially, age- and size-related declines were attributed to photosynthesis-respiration imbalance. Subsequently, several competing hypotheses have been proposed over the years, although nutrient and hydraulic limitation hypotheses appear to be the most likely to have caused it. In this paper, the authors attempt to review these hypotheses and concentrate on one related aspect, as this can set the scene for further examining the issues of age-related versus size-related processes.

Item Type:Article
Keyword:Forest growth, canopies, photosynthesis – respiration imbalance
Faculty or Institute:Faculty of Forestry
Publisher:Universiti Putra Malaysia Press
ID Code:5829
Deposited By: Norhazura Hamzah
Deposited On:05 May 2010 02:06
Last Modified:27 May 2013 07:25

Repository Staff Only: item control page

Document Download Statistics

This item has been downloaded for since 05 May 2010 02:06.

View statistics for "Net Primary Productivity of Forest Trees: A Review of Current Issue"


Universiti Putra Malaysia Institutional Repository

Universiti Putra Malaysia Institutional Repository is an on-line digital archive that serves as a central collection and storage of scientific information and research at the Universiti Putra Malaysia.

Currently, the collections deposited in the IR consists of Master and PhD theses, Master and PhD Project Report, Journal Articles, Journal Bulletins, Conference Papers, UPM News, Newspaper Cuttings, Patents and Inaugural Lectures.

As the policy of the university does not permit users to view thesis in full text, access is only given to the first 24 pages only.