Effects of Low Irradiance on Growth, Water Uptake and Yield of Tomatoes Grown by the Nutrient Film Technique

Ismail, Mohd Razi and Ali, Zainab (1994) Effects of Low Irradiance on Growth, Water Uptake and Yield of Tomatoes Grown by the Nutrient Film Technique. Pertanika Journal of Tropical Agricultural Science, 17 (2). pp. 89-93. ISSN 0126-6128

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Abstract

A study was carried out on the effects of irradiance on growth and development of tomatoes grown using the Nutrient Film Technique(NFr). Plants were exposed to mean daily irradiance levels of 14. 7, 8.5, 3.3 and 0.87 MJ m-2day-l achieved by using different levels of shade. High irradiance (14.7 and 8.5 MJ m-2day-1) increased leaf area and dry weight, root and stem dry weight compared to the plants grown under lower irradiance. Plants under shade were up to 5 DC cooler than those under high irradiance. Plant water uptake and leaf nutrient concentrations in the leaves were generally lower in shaded plants than those in full sun. The highest fruit production was obtained with an irradiance of 14. 7 MJ m-2 day-l. Plants grown under 3.3 and 0.87 MJ m-2 day-J failed to fruit.

Item Type:Article
Keyword:low irradiance, growth, water uptake, yield, tomatoes, Nutrient Film Technique
Publisher:Universiti Putra Malaysia Press
ID Code:3230
Deposited By: Nasirah Abu Samah
Deposited On:24 Nov 2009 08:09
Last Modified:27 May 2013 07:06

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